Wupatki National Monument

April 18, 2018. It’s a gorgeous morning, and I can’t believe the sleep I got last night! Not a single sound in our camp. We were totally alone and the stars were particularly bright.  

We  head out to visit the different areas where Wupatki Pueblo ruins can be seen.

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We start with the Wupatki National Monument Visitor’s Center, the hub of it all where visitors get the brochures and all the info about this beautiful place.

Wupatki Pueblo was built and occupied during the 1100s and abandoned after a nearby volcano erupted and forced them to vacate the high desert land they had cultivated for 400 years.

Their homes were built with stones cemented with clay and entrance was gained through the roofs made with wooden support beams, support poles, and covered by shakes, grass and clay or adobe. The rock and mortar are still here today, however the roofs are long gone due to rot and scavenging by those needing the wood

We motor back down to the Citadel Pueblo. As I grab the camera (which focuses, after being dropped, some of the time … there’s a lot of fiddling) and leave the boys in the van with the windows partly down I hear howls of protest. Geez, can’t even get a bit of time to myself! Poor spoiled babies.

Are these awesome or what? I am fascinated with these ruins, and the thought crosses my mind that Arizona has so much to offer.

Hopping back in the van I fire her up and we head to the Lomaki Ruins

If I have the opportunity to come this way again I will take the road to Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument coming out of Flagstaff and do the loop which will only add 15 miles to our northerly trip and will be able to take in both Sunset Crater and Wupatki.
Now it’s decision time. Go? Stay? I opt to head out. The predicted wind doesn’t seem like it’s going to be much of a problem … Ha!

Thanks for stopping by 2Dogs! We’re having a blast and I hope you are enjoying coming along for the adventure. Hugs, Shawna