The Polar Vortex and a Super Snow Moon

February 19, 2019 I just happen step outside MissAdventure in the early morning hours before dawn and see the Super Snow Moon falling slowly behind the mountains to the west. I am thrilled to have awoken to this as my shots of the super moon rising did not turn out well.


The temps have been dropping as the weather people around the nation herald the coming of a Polar Vortex. Little did any of us realize just how bad it was going to get. By February 22 Flagstaff was reporting 40” of snow; a one day record since records have been kept. Kingman had 18”, the road into Payson was closed due to the snow. Snowflake AZ saw snowflakes, Benson saw snowflakes as did Nogales on the US-Mexican border.
Mammoth Lakes on 395 in California received over 22 feet. Going to have to take that camp off our list for summer! They may never get anything but the roads cleared there this year!

Oregon had record snowfalls as did Washington. The places in the nation that always get snow, got more than they bargained for. It’s a crazy winter for sure! Bet YOUR area saw some interesting weather, too!

The Chiweenie Brothers and I spend most of our days inside. It’s too cold and/or windy to be comfortable outside for very long so only the necessary walks are taken. Poor guys are a bit bored.


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On one walk I gaze off into the distance and the Kofa Mountains look a little strange. What the heck? Oh I see what it is. The Kofas are wearing white!! It stays for a few days, too. Seems like Q, Yuma, and perhaps Ajo are the only places that didn’t get snow. I tell ya, Quartzsite is the best place to be in the winter, even though locals say this winter has been the coldest they’ve seen. So much for global WARMING …
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Storms, whether rolling in or on the wane usually leave some beauty behind.

DSC_0008MissAdventure with Pink CloudsThanks for stopping by 2Dogs! Hugs, Shawna and The Boys.

CURRENT READ:  Still working on Mary, Queen of Scots 

The Desert Turns Green

Quartzsite, Arizona, our winter refuge, is cool with lots of moisture; it is turning green.  Lush, spring grasses and plants put on a show that is beautiful in its simplicity.  One would not even notice if you hadn’t spent several winters here, or at least experienced a few of the winter months at some point.  Usually the greening of the desert is so brief it’s hard to imagine it even happens.  This year it happens.

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A Buttermilk Sky

DSC_0139The Desert is Turning Green, Plant with Rock

The spring flowers put on a colorful show and all of it with the “purple mountain majesty and the brilliant blue sky depending on the hour, is breathtaking.

The middle of February brings unusual cold, even frosty temps, lots of cold wind and some rain.  Many hours spent inside reading, planning, writing.

The boys need a little walk a couple of times a day and I bundle up and take them out.  It’s cold enough that my little Fries doesn’t mind at all when we head back to the van.

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They play, nap in the sun if it has made an appearance, and just generally go with flow.  On Occasion there’s a row, but for the most part they get along splendidly.

Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel! Hugs, Shawna

CURRENT READ:  Mary, Queen of Scots

 

We’re Back in Q

                                                                Life is short

November sure has whizzed by.  The Chiweenie Brothers and I made it to Arizona, spent a couple of nights at Craggy Wash in Lake Havasu where some guy tried to roust us from our spot beside a nice shade tree by whining about how this was the third time he’s lost out on this spot and HE needed shade­­­—like we didn’t!—and when I refused to give it up  he hopped in his rig and peeled out spraying us with small rocks and dirt!

When we left a couple of days later I got the tires rotated on MisAdventure, and then we spent some time at the SARA dog park. SARA Park has much to offer besides a wonderful dog park: Hiking and biking trails, an equestrian area, and more.

We move on to Parker where we spend one night off Hwy 62.  Last year’s camping area is inaccessible. Not sure if it was due to flash flooding or just the fact the road has been graded, but nothing looks familiar and I can’t find a spot with shade. One night here and we move on. Q (Quartzsite) here we come! 

I drive straight into town, get ice and fill up the generator (I love being able to use my Instant Pot!!) then head to the dog park.  Big surprise here.  The “Big Dog” side is closed for some unexplained reason and all are using the “Small Dog” side.  It isn’t working too well as the big dogs have pretty much taken over and there are plenty of little dogs that don’t like being in with them.  But, it is what it is. We will either spend more time in other areas of La Paz County or we can change our preferred time to be at this dog park to later in the afternoon. We’ll work it out!

Once the boys are ready to leave the dog park I drive to the library and try to get a blog post done.  I no longer have mobile internet as ATT said I used too many roaming hours and they cut me off everywhere there is no ATT cell tower.  Hmph!  This may be a long winter with fewer posts. Not surprisingly I still have to pay until my contract is up so I won’t be getting anything different at this time. Again … It is what it is.  I’ll work it out!

Meanwhile, out in the desert we settle onto BLM land with a sweet, shady spot at the Hi Jolly 14-day area.  Long walks with the boys in the chilly air of morning, some reading, checking email­­­—fortunately I can get my email and get onto the internet with my phone, but no way can I do a blog post from it— and I am able to make an appointment with my dentist in Los Algadones. But, before that happens we will head to Bouse and stay a night or two.  The boys will get to romp in the HUGE dog park there, I will get veggies from the truck that brings in produce fresh from the fields, and I will also attend a get-together with the Bouse Genies, the local genealogy group. 

This trip to our wintering grounds has brought some frustration, yes, but there has been blessings, too:  Lying in bed one night with the back doors open I watch the space station glide silently through the night sky.  Early mornings, before sunrise, I watch Venus hanging huge and glittering, low in the east as day tries to make her disappear for another 24 hours, Sun demanding her time in the sky. One morning Venus was next to the quarter moon; so beautiful!   

Some mornings Sun brushes past the distant mountains with a silent but huge burst of light, other mornings she makes a magnificent entry wearing a cloak of the softest pinks and lavenders or bright red and gold if she’s feeling brassy.

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Coyotes howl across the desert.  I do consider this a blessing, although it’s not much fun when they come in close trying to trick The Chiweenie Brothers into coming out to play which they did three nights running at one point.  Sends a chill up my spine.

Gorgeous sunsets and sunrises.  They make my heart sing in their beauty.

Thank you for stopping by 2DogsTravel. We appreciate you coming along on our adventures, and appreciate your patience while we get through this little internet glitch. Hugs, Shawna

Biding our Time In Q

We’ve had a cold spell in the desert. For about a week we have had some chilly weather with a cold wind reminding us that, after all, it IS winter. A couple of recent nights it’s been a teeth chattering 36-37 degrees inside the van when morning breaks.  I take the boys for their early a.m. potty break, heat some water for coffee, then jump back under the covers and wait for the sun to warm our vome through the windshield.

I have a heater, but have never used it. I tend to just ride it out rather than artificially heat up the inside of the van, because it’s too hard to cool it back down once the day wears on. That’s been my experience around Quartzsite anyway; it may change when we leave here and head north, but we’ll take it as it comes.

Last year, by mid-March, the temps were climbing into the 80’s. That is barely tolerable when you live in a tiny home made of metal.  When it hit 85 we left and headed north toward home in Cali. We no longer live in Cali, but we will be heading north seeking cooler weather once it turns too warm here in the southern Arizona desert. That may be sooner than we expect if the chatter at the dog park is correct.

With a general idea of what route we will travel, the goal is to end up in southern Utah for a meet-up with a couple of gals I met at the RTR.  The trick is going to be timing:  Staying out of the encroaching heat, but arriving in Utah early enough to still be able to take in Arches, Zion, Bryce Canyon before they, too, become too hot.

While biding our time waiting on the weather to send us scampering to get away from the heat we spend time at the Quartzsite Dog Park, rock hound on our morning and evening walks, and I do a lot of reading. Oh, and gazing at the barren mountain ranges, in this case the Plamosa Mountains, picking out shapes.  Do you see the lioness’ head?

Big Cat in mountain

CURRENT READ:  Beneath a Scarlett Sky. This is a good read, but for some reason it is taking me much longer than normal to finish it.  Perhaps because it’s another WWII story, and you know how heart wrenching those can be.

I spent the other day going through things in the storage area behind the bed sorting, tossing, and getting together a box of stuff to take to the Salvation Army. It’s an on-going process this continuing effort to get the vome cleared out of all the extras I brought along when we started our new life’s adventure of full-time traveling.

Ever being one not to waste anything or have to replace things I had extras of and brought with us to use up,  we’ve lived kind of crowded. Regular sorting, tossing, donating is needed to keep things organized as we rid the vome of stuff.  This last batch of unneeded items that went to the Salvation Army has gotten us to a I-can-see-the-finish-line place and the quest for having just what we need and not much more than that.  The goal of eventually having a place for everything and everything in it’s place is closer! Yippee!!!

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Our spot in Scaddan Wash.

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The full moon on March 1, 2018

Until next time, Hugs Shawna

 

 

The Great Tree

Alongside the north side of the courthouse in Quartzsite is a small sign and a short rock-lined path that takes you to The Great Tree, also known as The Witness Tree. DSC_0025

The boys and I walked this very short path today to gaze upon the large ironwood tree that has stood it’s ground for over one thousand years.

During Arizona’s centennial (February 14, 1912 to February 14, 2012) it was dubbed the Witness Tree, having lived and thrived in this desert environment and “witnessing” this state’s centennial.

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If you’re into heavenly happenings, mark tomorrow night, January 31st, on your calendar. Just before dawn you will be thrilled to see not only a super moon, but a super blue moon (second full moon in one month) along with a total eclipse!

Thanks for stopping by! Hugs, Shawna

RTR 2018

The Rubber Tramp Rendezvous, held each January on BLM land at Scaddan Wash,  is history for this year. Met some new friends, couldn’t find some I have been looking forward to meeting, and Charlie got us kicked out of one of the seminars.

He just couldn’t keep his barker quiet when other dogs were saying hello.  Charlie did, however, learn some better behavior in an all around sense so it was a very good experience for him and a relief for me.  He IS learning!!

The RTR is growing by leaps and bounds every year. From around 50 or 60 people just a few years ago to about 1200 last year, this year it was anticipated that the attendance would be so big that Bob Wells, the host and expert on van dwelling as he has been doing this for years, was required by BLM to bring in porta-potties for this year’s gathering. The unofficial count was over 3000 attendees, and I believe it.

Compared to last year when I arrived a couple of days early to try and find a bit of shade there were FOUR vehicles. This year my  early arrival found what looked like a vehicle beside every bush!

Except for a very few scoundrels, and there are those in every crowd, it was a well-behaved, respectful group.  Bob had the areas layed out into sections for Main Camp and Meeting Area, a section for the music crowd, a section for the disabled, a section for the larger vehicles.  Two seminars, sometimes three, were held each day of the two week event. At the end a women’s gathering was held.

Having been under constant stimulation from so many people and dogs, vehicles coming and going constantly, and the general noise of so many gathered in one place the boys needed some peace and quiet and I needed relief from the dust so we did not stay for the women’s event.

I met many wonderful people, but clicked with a couple of really nice gals, Peggy and Mary, and we have tentatively made plans to meet up again perhaps in Utah when it’s time to move north to escape the heat here in Arizona. Peg had to leave a bit early and get back to her job, but Mary and I gathered around the campfire every night and took a few walks. YES, she gets all that stuff in her Prius!!!

One of those walks was to search for the labyrinth that was somewhere near the camps.  We headed out to where we thought they were located and 45 minutes later while giving it up discovered the thing was right across the wash from Freedom!!

 

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Freedom is just to left of us across the wash!

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See Freedom lurking in the upper right corner?

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Thanks, as always, for stopping by 2DogsTravel!