BOYCE THOMPSON STATE ARBOREUM

Sunday, May 19, 2001 we point MissAdventure’s nose north. At 3000 feet it is cool and overcast; a perfect morning to take in the Boyce Thompson State Arboretum off Hwy 60 in Superior AZ. The palo verde trees are at their peak of bloom here and it’s a gorgeous drive.

They allow dogs to go along on the walk, and the boys are beyond excited to tag along.  I attach their leads and Fries grabs the leash dashing ahead trying to pull me along.

I pay the $12.50 entrance fee and we begin the mile and half loop, with many side trails to explore, that meanders through the canyon showing off its collection of desert plants and trees. It is spectacular!

A nice surprise as we come down off the trail and back to the beginning, a docent suggests the demonstration garden near the parking lot and exit.  A rose garden!!Delightful!

Continuing on we stop at Oak Flat Camp Ground nestled off Hwy 60 in the Tonto National Forest to camp for a couple of days. It is cool here with shade. Not much has changed since we were here two years ago.

Monday is cool, but windy, and we get some rain during the night. Enough moisture to dampen the ground, but being parked under the trees MissAdventure comes out of it looking like a spotted green thing of unknown origin.

This is a free Forest Service campground with tables, fire rings, and vault toilets.

Thanks for stopping by! Hugs, Shawna

Sloway and Cabin City in the Lolo National Forest

When we leave the Big Pine Fishing Access campground and continue our westward journey on I-90 I keep my eyes open for an improved campground, meaning one with pavement, water, garbage, tables, firepits.  We don’t need electricity or sewer so I’m not looking for THAT level of improvement, but we need something out of the mud.

It isn’t long before I spot a sign advertising a forest service campground called Sloway.  Sloway is in the Lolo National Forest and it is indeed an improved campground.  Being a national agency we will get half off the going rate.  Considering the retired, white-haired old lady I have become, that suits me fine!

I pull in, sign us up for a night just to see how it goes before committing to anything longer than one night.  We are in campsite 15.

This campground is chockfull of offerings. It has a picnic area, a launching area for canoes, kayaks, and rafts, a horse camp (which has it’s own entrance up the road), a section for large RVs with 7 pull-thru sites, 20 tent/car sites all with tables and fire rings. There are several vault toilets, 2 garbage collection sites, a recycling area, water spigots, and a camp host.  $10 per night, half that with senior pass. It’s right off the freeway, but traffic isn’t bothersome.  There is also a train that rolls through several times a day/night across the river, but I am either getting used to those sounds or going deaf. Not sure which it is.  What’s that, you say?  🙂  Lots of pines for shade.

We end up staying three days total, and you know what? I didn’t take any photos!  The old lady is losing it I guess!A

Before we get out of Montana we stay one night in another USFS campground called Cabin City. Much smaller than Sloway in the way of offerings, but has the basics: 2 loops of 12 sites each, tables, firepits, water, garbage, vault toilets.  It’s a pretty campground, but not so pretty getting there.  We drive past some drop-dead gorgeous homes and then at the turn to get to Cabin City, some pretty darn dumpy places.  All is well though, once you are in the campground. We saw a wild turkey sneaking through the undergrowth on one of our walks.  As in all of Montana, it’s bear country so keep your food inside your vehicle.

Thanks for stopping by!  Hugs, Shawna

CURRENT READ:  Still reading Colony by Anne Rivers Siddons … Good one!

Life is short 

 

 

 

 

Dry Creek Road

From Montpelier Canyon Campground we again head north on Hwy 89 and back into Wyoming. At every turn is a scene I simply must photograph.

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Or a wildflower calls out not to be forgotten.  They are everywhere!
DSC_0048 (2)Surely the westward travelers were uplifted and encouraged by the sights of this area when they marched ever onward toward Oregon and California. How sad it would have been to be too downtrodden with exhaustion to enjoy the beauty around them, those who travelled this area when the grass was new and the wildflowers burst forth.

As we get closer to the little town of Afton, and the even tinier town of Smoot, I begin searching for a forest service road somewhere along the highway in the Bridger-Teton National Forest when I spot Dry Creek Road.

The dirt road takes us back into the forest DSC_0053 (2)

and with all the rain up north, Dry Creek is anything but Dry. The roaring creek claws at the banks and the roots of the trees and bushes lining its path.

We drive back farther than I like to be without cell service and turn around, heading back to the very first camp site I saw once past the houses on private land.  It’s very shaded!

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We take long walks and long naps, spending two nights here.

 

 

 

 

The boys smell something in the air

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Thanks for stopping by 2Dogs!

CURRENT READ: Sweet Hollow Women   by Holly Tierney-Bedord

 

 

 

Three Camps

May 7, 2018.  After our one night in Piute Reservoir State Park we once again head north on 89.  We need supplies and I don’t feel like searching for a campsite so it’s going to be a Wally night in the town of Richfield, UT

Before settling down in our spot on the macadam at Wally World I find a Lion’s Park  and The Chiweenie Brothers and I spend the majority of the day in the shade of some large oaks .  I read, the boys enjoy the lush grass on their long leads attached to the stakes I push into the soft carpet of grass.

Next morning, up early, I purchase our supplies, and we move on to a camp off Gooseberry Road that runs alongside I-15 near Salina. It’s a nice, quiet, free camp with about seven or eight spots next to a muddy little river. It has a vault toilet, fire rings, and metal tables.  And lots of fox tail weeds.  They are green so not much of a problem, but I wouldn’t want to be here when they dry.

After two nights here we move on to a spot in the Manti-La Sal National Forest near Spring City, winding through houses, then farms until we get to the Forest Service road that takes us to the top of the mountain. The road is a little wash boardy and narrow in a few places,  but the road ending at a trail head has a vault toilet and several real nice tent camping sites.

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This is the hiking trail not the road we came in on!

 A couple are coming down off the trail with their golden retriever.  The man puts a set of goggles on the dog after he helps him into the back of their pickup; the man explains the dog has allergies.

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The Chiweenie Brothers and I hike a ways up the trail, but don’t get too far.  I am not sure what the altitude is here, but I get out of breath enough to decide to head back to the van. I decide to take a nap., and it’s not long before I hear a hearty shout. “Hello! Anybody home?”  It’s a gentleman who works for the utility company and he’s here to ride his ATV up the trail to check on things.

We chat for a bit, and after talking with him I decide to go back down nearer civilization. The bears are awake he tells me, and they’re hungry; don’t leave food out.  He also says a storm is coming in.  AND …. as I’ve already found out for myself,  there’s no internet up here. I thank him for the info and he loads up his ATV and heads down the mountain.  Worried that rain may make the road a snotty mess we head back down, too.

It was a good decision as later that afternoon a storm does indeed blow in and the mountain’s top is wreathed in fog. We are here until Monday as the weather is worse, according to my weather app, the farther north you go.  And we have internet down here 🙂 and a lovely little burbling creek to lull us to sleep at night. It’s a wonderful four days in our little camp.

DSC_0008We are up early —- let me rephrase that—- I am up early on Monday and finish the last little bit of stuff that needs doing before we head out. The boys are still snuggled under the covers because it’s kind of nippy this morning. They soon rally forth though, once they realize I am fixing their breakfast.

I take them for a quick walk after they eat and then I climb into the driver’s seat and they clamber up on their front passenger platform and settle in.  Off we go.

I make a few stops in town as I had noticed these old homes on the way to our camp and I wanted to take some shots of them before heading to Spanish Fork to pick up the mail and find a boondocking site.

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And THIS is the school!!!   DSC_0014

Hugs from me and The Chiweenie Brothers. Thanks for stopping by.

All we have to do is

 

 

 

Flagstaff and Walnut Canyon

After our few days on the Forest Road off of 89A we head on into Flagstaff. The usual routine ensues.  Walmart to pick up groceries, water, and ice, and find the local dog park.  Flagstaff has THREE. I find the one closest to where we are and the boys get their playtime in. No photos of the little beasts as the park is completely shaded. And besides I am too lazy to go back to the van and get the camera.

Flagstaff is a beautiful town nestled in pine trees. It is surrounded by volcanoes and in most places you can see Arizona’s highest mountain, Humphrey’s Peak, 12,633 feet in height.

After The Chiweenie Brothers are sufficiently tired out we stick around the park and I check out the map then we’re off to Walnut Canyon.  We can stay very near the Walnut Canyon Monument and still be within ten miles of town when we need to re-supply.

We find a very nice spot beside an huge old juniper tree.

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Charlie, forever on the lookout for lizards even if it means wiggling under the windshield cover in the early morning sun.

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The boys enjoy some sunshine outside while waiting for me to get the gear gathered for a walkabout in our second camp within this same boondocking area of the Coconino  National Forest on the east side of Flagstaff.

DSC_0001 (1)Thanks for stopping by!  Hugs, Shawna

 

CURRENT READ:  Turbo Twenty-Three, a Stephanie Plum novel by Janet Evanovich