Riverview Camp Ground, Gila Box

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October 30th and 31st
It’s an easy, early trip from Bowie to Safford, AZ where we find a Wally and get supplies, and finally, finally find block ice! Walmart didn’t have it, but there is an “ice house” (that’s what the clerk calls it) next door and she assures me they have it.
Supplies bought and put away, the clean cube ice now in liquid form, is drained out of the water container that I cut the lid off of to hold the bagged ice is poured into a drinking water container. The block ice is put into the now empty ice container and we are off to the Riverview Camp Ground in the Gila Box Reparian Conservation Area.

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One small sign obviously wasn’t enough. They added another, bigger one!

It’s quite a drive, not in miles, but in pucker factor. The last few miles are still paved road, but it is winding, one lane, oh-my-gosh-it-looks-like-they-have-had-a-serious washout-can-I-make it, 15% grade in places, praying-no-one-comes-along-in-the-opposite-direction kind of road. We make it, but BOY HOWDY!!!

Expecting trees I am dismayed to find they are along the river, of course, that is down in the canyon where no camping is allowed. It’s a pretty view, though.
I choose a campsite and walk up to the iron ranger and pull out my checkbook, paying for two nights. $5 per night is the fee, but it’s half price with a senior pass.

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We may or may not stay additional time. The temps and internet availability will decide that for us. Although they have covered picnic tables, fire rings, BBQs, potable water, and very clean pit toilets, parking in the sun can make for very uncomfortable van temps that take forever to cool down even after dark.

Discovering there is no internet or cell service I get a lot done in the van over our two-day stay: inside blackout inserts removed and replaced with lace curtains, doubled for more privacy. I like this a lot better. I will keep the inserts to use to cover windows from the outside to keep the van cooler. I also shore up the drawer unit where the passenger seat used to be—the boys sit on the top while we are traveling—as it has shifted with all the rough road and steep grades we’ve driven on since driving in the desert southwest.

I also decide to keep the camp chair with its fold-down side table inside and open. A one-drawer plastic storage unit fits perfectly underneath and extra water jugs along the side between chair and bed. It’s easily lifted up to take outside when I want to do that, and the drawer underneath can be pulled out to take out to the table.

I put clear mailing tape on the rare earth magnets that I use to keep the outside window covers in place. They are strong enough to put blood blisters on one’s fingers if you lose your grip while trying to pull them apart, and the tape tabs seem to not only prevent that but also makes them much easier to pull away from the van when it’s time to remove the covers.

Having a place to sit and being able to see out when we are stuck inside due to the wind wreaking havoc with my sinuses or if a storm blows through will make those situations a whole lot nicer to deal with.

The campground is nicely maintained and there are lots of little rock-lined trails kept nice and tidy. I couldn’t find the camp host when I thought about asking who did all the rock work, but I would imagine it was a civic group or perhaps some inmates. In any case it’s looks very, very nice.

On our last evening in this camp we are rewarded with a very nice sunset. And perhaps a little Halloween treat —- can you see the dog in the sky? Or perhaps it’s a hound from the Baskervilles …


Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel. Hugs, Shawna

CAMP AMENITIES
Water: Yes Garbage: Yes
Bathrooms: Vault toilets Electricity: No
Tables: Yes, with shade covers Shower: No
Fire Pit: Yes BBQ: Yes
# of Sites: about 15 with lots of space between Fee: $5 per night, half that with senior pass
Other: Nice walking trails, nice view, very steep downhill grade to get to this camp. The camp host had a large trailer, but honestly I would be very cautious if it were me towing that big thing down this road

Just a Little Thing

Yes, just a little thing, but it’s progress, right?  Any little thing is progress.  I find the need to do a little something in Freedom at quite regular intervals, or I become antsy that my dream may never happen.  Kind of “keeping it alive” thinking.  Oh, I know I will do this vandwelling traveling thing at some point, but working on something in Freedom keeps me in the frame of mind that it will happen sooner rather than later.  I would prefer sooner, but it may have to be later.  So be it.  I will keep on keepin’ on until that perfect moment when it all comes together and the dogs and I say adios to our mountain home and head off into whatever adventure comes our way.  Hey!  That’s a line from “Born to be Wild”.   Born to be wiiiiiild.  I don’t know about wild, but born to travel, yes.  🙂 

I won’t drag this out too long because I know you are dying to see what that little project is, so here are the shots.  Bet you can’t figure out what this is (other than a basket, 🙂

Aw, you’re too smart!  If you guessed it’s the hole where the old TV was installed, you are exactly right.  I am not sure this will be a permanent installation of this basket, but it’s staying there for now.  And I didn’t want it to look all temporary forever so I sewed up a little curtain to cover the hole and it’s resident basket.  The curtain rod is just resting on the wood frame inside the hole. 


 So that’s it for this little project.  Have a great week!  Thanks for stopping by Two Dogs!
Hugs, Shawna

LOVE This Blue

Howdy.  Hope all is well with you. 

Today I wanted to show you the curtains I made to cover Freedom’s skylight windows.  Our 1998 Ford Conversion van has long, narrow windows in the high top portion of the roof and they are set at an angle.  Boy do they let in a lot of heat. And that can be useful or brutal; I needed a way to regulate it. 

The solution was a long narrow strip of Reflectix for each of those strips of windows along both sides.  Reflectix is so useful, but it’s so ugly; some curtains were in order.  I also wanted a way to let the sun shine into those skylight windows should we be caught in a cold spell somewhere. Reflectix fixes both problems. 

If the sun is shining and it’s cold out, the Reflectix comes down along with the curtains. Lots of warming is on its way. If it’s warm outside, the Reflectix goes up as well as the curtains and that brutal heat is tamed.  Put ’em up, take ’em down….   Rawwhhhhhhide!!!!  OOPS!  Sorry go carried away.  But hey, do you  remember Clint Eastwood playing Rowdy Yates?  Oh my….    Where was I?  Oh yes, Freedom’s  curtains.

Once on the road there may be need of adjustments.  Or the curtains may get an overhaul at some point but for now they are working and I like how they look  (I LOVE that blue!). 

This is Reflectix, being used here in the windows of the side doors to reflect heat. I used this photo because Freedom is in storage and basically I am too lazy to go over there and get a different photo 🙂   If you look closely you can see the skylight windows at the top left corner. 

If you remember from a previous post the other side of the Reflextic is covered with black, tightly woven fabric.  That side will be used at night if we need to be in stealth mode.  That post is here https://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=3720370496126944301#editor/target=post;postID=916008398565535451;onPublishedMenu=posts;onClosedMenu=posts;postNum=7;src=postnameERE.

Below are the curtains I made for the skylight windows.  It’s just a long, long strip of fabric (did I mention I LOVE this blue?) with a casing sewn along each long edge, top and bottom.  Florist wire was used in the casings to hold the curtains’ shape and position; I didn’t want them hanging straight down, but rather held in place up against the angle of those windows. The florist wire along the bottom edge does the trick by helping to keep the bottom resting on the ledge just below the windows.  I used small drapery hooks to hang them up.  I attached a safety pin to the curtain from the back, going in behind the florist wire and then back through the fabric and then closed the safety pin.  The pin was then hooked over the pointy, straight, open hook part of the drapery hook.  (EW, too many hooks in that sentence, but I don’t know how else to explain it.) Then the part of the hook that would normally attach to the drapery rod attachment is hung over the strip of wood trim that runs along the top of those long, narrow windows.  It’s a bit saggy, and I need to adjust where the hook is attached to the fabric and/or add more hooks so it will hang just along the top edge of the wood trim like it does ion the right side of this photo. These hooks will make the curtain easy to take down and put up.

 
Thanks for stopping by Two Dogs today.  We appreciate your interest in reading about the process of getting Freedom ready to roll and our planned future of adventure. 
 
The Chiweenie Brothers, Burger,  and I wish you a lovely day.
 
Hugs, Shawna