The Devil’s Punchbowl and the Yaquina Lighthouses

Between Depoe Bay and Newport lies the Devil’s Punchbowl, a beautiful bridge/cave rock formation where the sea ebbs and flows through it.  I am thoroughly intrigued.

Yaquina Lighthouse is a bit further south.  DSC_0005 (1)Yaquina Head Lighthouse

Common Murres, in from nine months on the sea, make this rock their home for the three months it takes to lay their eggs and raise their chicks. Then it’s back out to sea.

From here, the next stop is Yaquina Head and another beautiful lighthouse,

DSC_0018 (1)Yaquina Bay Lighthouse  and the bridge over the bay. Such a gorgeous area.

DSC_0024 (1)Yaquina Bay Bridge

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We head on to Newport where the boys get in some dog park time, then I make a stop at Walmart for supplies. Not having refrigeration and depending on an ice chest to keep some of our food cold, re-supplying happens about once a week. Ice will last in my cheapie Igloo Island Breeze for a minimum of five days due to the heavy insulation I use in and on it, so that’s not too bad, but it’s small and the block of ice takes up half the room. 🙂 Fortunately I am fine with having very few items that need refrigeration.

Thanks for coming along on our adventures!  Hugs, Shawna

Boiler Bay. Depoe Bay. Rocky Creek Viewpoint

August 4, 2018 . We leave Lincoln City behind and continue south. Destination: Boiler Bay.  It’s a beautiful day with a bit of a breeze and the sun playing hide and seek. I thoroughly enjoy the ride even though traffic is heavy; It’s summer and this is Highway 101 …

We pull into the wayside at Boiler Bay and Sandy is right behind us.  I snap the leashes onto the boys’ harnesses and saunter over to the fence at the edge of the parking lot gazing out over the bay, eyes casting about for whales. Nothing.

Sandy shows me the inside of her new Mercedes cargo van. She shares that she came over from an appointment in Portland where she had the inside outfitted to truly make it a home on wheels.  It’s beautiful!!!

We go back to the overlook and chat as we keep an eye on the water so we don’t miss a whale sighting.  Sandy got her master’s degree in age and aging at the age of 60! She is retired now, but likes to keep busy volunteering to help in disaster type situations around the country.  She’s originally from  the east coast, but currently from Austin, Texas where she took care of her mother until her passing.

Someone shouts that they  have spotted a whale, and sure enough a young gray is seen in the water.

After seeing this young whale surface again and again over the course of about a half hour, Sandy leaves for her camp at KOA in preparation for her trip to Lake Tahoe in the morning. I drive back north to Lincoln City for another night at the Chinook Winds Casino.

The next morning the boys and I take in Depoe Bay on our way to Newport.

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This young lady is tracking radio-tagged marbled murrelets for the University of Oregon.

DSC_0047Young Lady working for University of Oregon Tracking Marbled Murrlets  A plaque here on the rock wall honors two men who lost their lives trying to save others.

As our coastal meander continues we take a side road to Rocky Creek State Scenic Viewpoint.  I love this rock house perched on the cliff overlooking the ocean,  and the old bridge over the Creek.

Our day continues . . .

 

The SnoPark, Timber Lodge, and Zig Zag Falls

Friday, July 20, 2018. It’s a warm, sunny beginning to the day even at 6:00 a.m.  As I pull out of the rest area north of Madras, Oregon I think of the cooler weather up ahead. At least I am hoping it will be cooler.

We are headed west, still on Hwy 26, and drive through the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Other than the casino at the very eastern end there isn’t much out here but a few houses here and there, brush and some timber. The wind is blowing sideways, and it’s pretty strong.  I white knuckle through and we gain the SnoPark with no mishaps.

The plan is to stay at the SnoPark in the Mt Hood National Forest for a few days.  Upon arrival I note there are a few travel trailers and a motorhome or two. The very large parking area is divided in half by a strip of brush and trees, and the vault toilet is located here, too. I find a spot on the west side. There is only one other vehicle parked here and he’s at the very tippy top, next to the road. It’s a peaceful quiet night.

July 21st, Saturday.  I feed the boys and we take a walk.  I discover, on the other side of the access road to the SnoPark, a small dispersed campsite on a dirt road.  We finish our walk then we move to the new camp.  Big mistake.

As the morning gives way to afternoon we are bombarded with dirt bikes. Waves of dirt bikes in groups of five or six roar past our camp and envelope us in dust.  Once the herd is past it is quiet for the rest of the day, but they again gear up and roar past in the evening.

We take a wander across the road to the parking lot and discover the SnoPark has filled to capacity with a sea of moms and dads, grandpas and grandmas and their motor homes and travel trailers, some tents.  All manner of recreational vehicles and trailers here for a motor cross event!  Oh boy, that explains the dirt bikes. We hear a few oohs and awwwes, directed toward The Chiweenie Brothers. I know they are smiling!

It does quiet down for a good night’s rest, but next morning I hear revelie.  The motoring herd will once again make an appearance.  Enough of this, we’re outta here. It takes a mere ten minutes to pack up and we are on the road. I love being so mobile!

We drive to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood.  I LOVE Mt. Hood.   There is just something very special about this mountain, but I have no idea what.  Maybe the lush green that surrounds it?  Maybe the way it juts up into sky with a commanding air?  I don’t know.

You can read more about historic Timberline Lodge HERE .

I make a quick, illegal stop along the highway on the way back down the mountain to get a couple of shots of these small waterfalls alongside the road.

As we tip over the top and begin the decent down Hwy 26 toward civilization again, I begin looking for the road into Zig Zag Falls that I had found on the map last night.

An easy hike and a beautiful water fall.

Love this old bridge, part of the old highway that once went through here at one time.

As we are taking in the bridge and surrounding area I discover a small empty campsite right at the perimeter of the parking lot. It’s banked on both sides with green bushes and sits right along Zig Zag Creek. We spend the night here before continuing on down the highway.