January 2019, Round Two

In mid-January we head to Bouse where I attend another Bouse Genies’ class, this one on using the Legacy program. Interesting and informative. The boys get their time in the dog park before and after class.
The third week in January we head toward Yuma. This adorable church nestled in an agricultural area caught my eye.

DSC_0081Pause Rest Worship sign
DSC_0078Little Church

On to Fortuna Pond we find “our” spot unoccupied and we settle in. On day three I pull a filling and part of a front bottom tooth out while flossing and make an appointment with my dentist in Los Algadones. We spend the night at Walmart, and the boys get to visit the Bark Park just up the street the next morning. Another night at Wally and we head back to Fortuna Pond, this gem of an oasis nestled near Yuma’s luscious fields of crops, where we spend about a week.

DSC_0115Blue Heron with In Focus Eye
DSC_0117Heron Taking Off of Fortuna PondDSC_0103Coot on Fortuna Pond DSC_0099Coot Taking Off

 

 

Star gazing is wonderful out here where no city lights can obscure the night sky’s brilliant display, and if it’s a moonless night and the crop dusters aren’t flying the sky is even more captivating, diamond strewn and sparkling against the inky blackness.
One night I see three orange globes—or perhaps one winking on and off as it fell—bigger than an exercise ball fall from a low altitude out of the sky. Two nights later a white basketball-sized meteor fell from east to west lighting up the area for about five seconds before disappearing, its long tail fading behind it. Oh for shots of those two displays!
And the coyotes put on an unbelievable concert. I’ve never heard what sounded like an army of them, and the vocalizations were fierce, perhaps taking down an animal. A few nights later they could be heard again, not so many, and one howling away. Fries answered him with a howl or two of his own. Next day I research coyote “talk” and my heart skipped a beat when I read that the howl is given when the coyote wants others to know his location. Cute as it was, Fries will not be answering anymore howls!
Thanks for stopping by 2Dogs! Hugs, Shawna
CURRENT READ: Halsey Street by Naima Coster

Ch, ch, ch, chhick …

At least that’s how I think one would spell the sound of the tiny ratchet wrench the implant doctor uses to set the molly screw-like pins into my lower jaw after drilling two tiny holes.  Once that’s completed Dr. Cochran sets my crowns.  It’s interesting that the zirconium, unlike porcelain crowns, are adjusted by grinding off the top rather than removing the crown and taking off product from the bottom, putting the crown back on and removing again if it isn’t right. This process goes so much faster.  And, according to Dennis (the dentist) I can now chew nails!  ;-).

Richy takes me over to the pharmacy and I get antibiotics, pain killers, some ibuprofen, and a bacteria killing mouth rinse.  All that is left is to return next fall to have the crowns put on the then healed bone. If it weren’t so dang hot here in June they could do it then as the bone will have filled in and anchored the screw within six months, but it is too hot and The Chiweenie Brothers can’t be left in MisAdventure  in June!

Leaving Los Algodones, the boys and I head back north with a friend we met in Q and ran into at the dog park in Yuma.  Ann has two pups and is living in her Rialto.  She’s from Nebraska (and a very interesting person if I can get her to let me post about it!) and never wants to go back.  She wanted to cross the border with us, so now we are headed to Fortuna Pond where she will catch up with us there after she resupplies.

DSC_0039Sunrise Over Fortuna Pond
Sunrise over the pond

Fortuna Pond is on BLM land and is a small fishing pond for locals.  It’s a bit tropical looking with sunny spots on the north side and shady spots on the south side, a few palm trees, and lots of green reeds. Guess which side we choose?  *smile*

As we are walking around the pond and pass a passenger van I hear, “Shawna, is that you?”  What the heck?  A small woman with short black hair and a wiry little tan colored dog  walks around the front of her van, extends her hand, and introduces herself as Sherry.

“Sherry!  I know you! Through the blog!  How nice to meet you in person!” I tell her.  It always astounds me to cross paths with a reader.  It will be fun to get to know her.

DSC_0054Blue Heron at Fortuna Pond
Heron with sun gilding the tops of the reeds. Love this shot, but wish the blue heron had been clearer
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Osprey searching for a meal

Love this camping spot!  I will be back before this winter is over.

Thanks for stopping by 2Dogs!  Hugs, Shawna

 

We’re Back in Q

                                                                Life is short

November sure has whizzed by.  The Chiweenie Brothers and I made it to Arizona, spent a couple of nights at Craggy Wash in Lake Havasu where some guy tried to roust us from our spot beside a nice shade tree by whining about how this was the third time he’s lost out on this spot and HE needed shade­­­—like we didn’t!—and when I refused to give it up  he hopped in his rig and peeled out spraying us with small rocks and dirt!

When we left a couple of days later I got the tires rotated on MisAdventure, and then we spent some time at the SARA dog park. SARA Park has much to offer besides a wonderful dog park: Hiking and biking trails, an equestrian area, and more.

We move on to Parker where we spend one night off Hwy 62.  Last year’s camping area is inaccessible. Not sure if it was due to flash flooding or just the fact the road has been graded, but nothing looks familiar and I can’t find a spot with shade. One night here and we move on. Q (Quartzsite) here we come! 

I drive straight into town, get ice and fill up the generator (I love being able to use my Instant Pot!!) then head to the dog park.  Big surprise here.  The “Big Dog” side is closed for some unexplained reason and all are using the “Small Dog” side.  It isn’t working too well as the big dogs have pretty much taken over and there are plenty of little dogs that don’t like being in with them.  But, it is what it is. We will either spend more time in other areas of La Paz County or we can change our preferred time to be at this dog park to later in the afternoon. We’ll work it out!

Once the boys are ready to leave the dog park I drive to the library and try to get a blog post done.  I no longer have mobile internet as ATT said I used too many roaming hours and they cut me off everywhere there is no ATT cell tower.  Hmph!  This may be a long winter with fewer posts. Not surprisingly I still have to pay until my contract is up so I won’t be getting anything different at this time. Again … It is what it is.  I’ll work it out!

Meanwhile, out in the desert we settle onto BLM land with a sweet, shady spot at the Hi Jolly 14-day area.  Long walks with the boys in the chilly air of morning, some reading, checking email­­­—fortunately I can get my email and get onto the internet with my phone, but no way can I do a blog post from it— and I am able to make an appointment with my dentist in Los Algadones. But, before that happens we will head to Bouse and stay a night or two.  The boys will get to romp in the HUGE dog park there, I will get veggies from the truck that brings in produce fresh from the fields, and I will also attend a get-together with the Bouse Genies, the local genealogy group. 

This trip to our wintering grounds has brought some frustration, yes, but there has been blessings, too:  Lying in bed one night with the back doors open I watch the space station glide silently through the night sky.  Early mornings, before sunrise, I watch Venus hanging huge and glittering, low in the east as day tries to make her disappear for another 24 hours, Sun demanding her time in the sky. One morning Venus was next to the quarter moon; so beautiful!   

Some mornings Sun brushes past the distant mountains with a silent but huge burst of light, other mornings she makes a magnificent entry wearing a cloak of the softest pinks and lavenders or bright red and gold if she’s feeling brassy.

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Coyotes howl across the desert.  I do consider this a blessing, although it’s not much fun when they come in close trying to trick The Chiweenie Brothers into coming out to play which they did three nights running at one point.  Sends a chill up my spine.

Gorgeous sunsets and sunrises.  They make my heart sing in their beauty.

Thank you for stopping by 2DogsTravel. We appreciate you coming along on our adventures, and appreciate your patience while we get through this little internet glitch. Hugs, Shawna

Edson Creek Campground, Sixes Oregon

 

It’s almost the end of September. We are about 10 miles inland from the coast, and the nights are cool and the days pleasant. Sparse traffic makes for a peaceful camp, and The Chiweenie Brothers and I enjoy lots of long, leisurely walks along paved road.

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I had not planned on staying so long here, although it’s a lovely campground, but an order I placed with Amazon is taking its sweet time to arrive. Part of the order has been delivered,  but the other half is napping in Salt Lake City ….

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My phone doesn’t work here, but I can text. My Mobely hotspot signal comes and goes, but at least it works sometimes.  It’s all good.  The boys and I deal with what’s handed to us and make do, happily.  Most times. Ha!

Beside the walks, I read and crochet and check Amazon  a dozen times a day to see where the other half of my order is languishing. We drive into Port Orford to purchase ice and a few supplies and drive down to the harbor. The view of the bay provides a gorilla’s profile in the large rock in front of us. Do you see it?

DSC_0012Bay at Port Orford ORHow about a cow’s face in a tree at our camp site? DSC_0001

Back at camp I fill out another tag and write out another check for three more days then take the boys for a walk where we discover Mr. Wooly Bear caterpillar. Next spring he will become a tiger moth.  Folklore says you can predict the weather by how much black is on the coat of the wooly bear. The more black on their coat the colder and wetter the winter will be. Looks to me like it’s almost a tossup this year.
DSC_0008We continue to bide our time over the weekend, and finally, FINALLY, on Tuesday the package is delivered. Amazon’s Prime 2-day delivery only took a week :), but you gotta love UPS! Those dudes will deliver anywhere; right up to our campsite at Edson Creek Campground in Sixes, Oregon.

It’s late in the afternoon by the time my Amazon order arrives so we will stay another night here then head south early tomorrow morning on the last leg of our Oregon Coast summer trip. Getting so excited to see family and friends.

Thanks for stopping by!!!  Hugs, Shawna and The Boys

CAMP AMENITIES
Water:  Yes. I spigot near Host’s site    Garbage: Yes
Bathrooms:  Yes, vault                            Electricity: No
Tables: Yes                                                Shower: No
Fire Pit:  Yes                                              BBQ: Grate on fire pit, but is non-adjustable
# of Sites: 20                                              Fee: $8 per night, seniors with pass $4
Other:

 

 

 

Fishtrap BLM Campsite

June 26, 2018.  We are up early — and have been most every morning since leaving the mountains of Montana and Idaho.  Dang! Sunrise is early when there’s no mountains to delay it! We really don’t mind because the air is deliciously cool.  I feed the boys and make coffee, and of course the morning walk. It’s quick, quick, quick, no longer than needed to take care of business. I am anxious to leave the city behind; some peace and quiet is needed.

We head to the Laughing Dog Park so The Chiweenie Brothers can get in one last romp here. It’s all but empty, but we three walk the perimeter a couple of times, then back in the van, and I poke the van’s nose out into traffic from the on-ramp and head west on I-90.  Spokane traffic is unbelievable, but I suppose that’s just me.  Not used to it, and don’t want to get used to it.  However, we are soon out of the city proper and traffic thins.

We are headed west is all I know at this point, to eventually get to Moses Lake, when I spot the sign for Fishtrap with the little brown triangular sign that signifies camping. And what do you know, it’s BLM land.  It’s easy to find the designated site, and there’s only two other people here, camped at the only table.  There’s room for four or five very close campers, but we’re only here for a night or two. We’ll deal with it.  There is a vault toilet and gathered-rock fire rings.

The campsite is on a bluff that overlooks Smick Meadow and a lovely little pond.

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On the bluff to the left is an old barn. I leash the boys and wander over to the sign that tells all about the area.  This is Folsom Farm, or what’s left of it, from the early 1900s. The barn still stands along with another outbuilding.  The house is long gone from a fire.  The farm was sold many times between it’s beginning and end.


DSC_0001 (7)     I am pleased to see that no vandalism has occurred here.  How nice!!!

All is quiet here during the night except for a distant train on occasion.

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In the morning I hear a coyote howl which reminds me of Arizona, which reminds me of the glorious sunrises and sunsets in the Arizona desert.  As if in answer to a silent yearning, the second morning we are blessed with this

DSC_0023 (5)There are no trees to give shade in this camp and considering it’s almost July, it’s beginning to warm up.  Too warm.  We head out, to once again take I-90 west.

I can’t resist stopping for a few moments to get shots of the wildflowers blooming with abandon along the road into Fishtrap Camp.

Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel. Hugs, Shawna

 

CAMP AMENITIES
Water:  No                                   Garbage: No — pack it in/pack it out
Bathrooms:  One Vault Toilet  Electricity: No
Tables: One in Camp area        Shower: No
Fire Pit: Makeshift fire rings   BBQ:  No
# of Sites:  Room for four/five Fee: Free
Other: There are picnic tables past the gates (they ask you that you keep the gates closed) and a hiking trail down to the pond.  

 

 

 

 

 

Homestake BLM and Butte, MT

We spend one night at Homestake, A BLM boondock near Whitehall, MT.  I can SEE cell towers but cannot get decent reception.  I drive on to Butte just a few miles up the road. It’s dog park time!

I ask around, no one seems to be able to tell me how to get to the dog park.  I stop at the information center and the lady behind the counter isn’t sure either as I asked for the park near the Old Sherman  School and this throws her off. She doesn’t know. The other gal behind the counter finishes her transaction with another customer, and she comes over and mentions the Skyline Park.  With that I get a street address and we are off.

JACKPOT! This wonderful place has THREE dog areas. Four if you count the off-leash area, but we aren’t interested in that.  One area for the big dogs, one area for the small dogs, and a combined area.

DSC_0026 (3)  This combined area for both large and small dogs is huge.

 

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Our first night at Walmart in Butte is uneventful, although there does seem to be an inordinate amount of street people around; no one bothers us. We have internet and we have a fabulous dog park. We can hang in there, and do Wally for a couple days!

The Skyline Park not only has three fenced areas for dogs, it has a fishing pond and a small play area for kids, paved and unpaved walking/biking paths, and pretty views all around.

Butte was founded on mining, a dangerous occupation that took many lives in one way or another. From the park  you can see the old Poor House, still pretty much as it was back in the day.  Today it is a technology school.

On our final day here I ask the boys if they want to go to the dog park again. They know these words, and start wrestling and play fighting,  so happy they can hardly stand it.  I put the breakfast things away, hop in the driver’s seat and start up ol’ Green. Fries jumps up on the camera back pack that’s sitting next to the driver’s seat. It’s on top of the little plastic drawer unit I have between the driver’s seat and the larger drawer unit that replaced the passenger seat. The camera backpack makes Fries’ little head just about even with mine.  I ask him if he is excited to be going to the dog park again this morning and the little stinker pushes his little wet nose against my cheek; a little peck on the cheek. Oh how I wish I could get photos of some of the things this little dog does. He just melts my heart!

Arriving at Skyline Park the boys, anxious to get inside “their” park, they pull and tug and tussle torn between starting play and pulling me along faster to get inside.

We know our way, mom, don’t worry about us!

 

Carbella BLM

Leaving the beauty that is Yellowstone National Park, I search for and find a place to have an early dinner.  The boys get their evening meal, too, and a short walkabout. While eating I research places to stay along Hwy 89 N and find Carbella, a Bureau of Land Management camp.  It’s not far and I am grateful to find not only a nice place to park but it’s shaded, too, and the campsites are close to the Yellowstone River.

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Room for any size rig, the road down to the camping area is dirt, but not a bad road at all. There are about eight sites with tables and fire rings, and a vault toilet and boat ramp.  There are spots to park for the night without the fire rings and tables.

We have a nice view of  the Absaroka Mountain Range when we take our walks.

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One afternoon we hear sirens and soon a helicopter flies overhead landing out near the highway somewhere.  Someone being airlifted out I suppose.  Reminds me of back home.

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Charlie B relaxes in camp.  DSC_0006 (4)

After enjoying a few nights here we pull out early in the morning and head toward Livingston. Montana is big and bold with formidable mountains and vast valleys. I enjoy the scenery

while The Chiweenie Brothers keep an eye out for any errant lizards they spot along the way. Of course that doesn’t happen so they nap.

 

As we gain Livingston I spy the Scrub Tub as we navigate the main thoroughfare. I take that as the sign it’s time to get laundry done.  Three loads washed and dried, and we go in search of the dog park. The Chiweenie Brothers desperately need some off leash run time.

I find the dog park. Although the Yellowstone borders the dog park on two sides  it’s not fenced.  This won’t do because being half badger hound the first moving critter they see and they will be off on the hunt.

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I ask a patron if there is a fenced park anywhere and she says yes, there is, and gives me some pretty vague directions. Off we go …

I find it only to be shut down again. Yes, it’s fenced. With hog wire that any self-respecting chiweenie could get through.  Even if that were not the case, the fenced area has no gates.  I start the green beast and begin getting her turned around all the while the boys are giving me the “what the hell?” look.  I feel so bad.

We continue on to Bozeman where, yet again, there is a problem regarding the dog park. I can’t find it.  There is construction in the area, and I only have a street not a specific address. I have no luck finding the dog park.  We spend the night at Wally.

On an ice run the next morning I spot a small sign that says “Rose Park” and I pull a U-turn (safely and legally!!!) and head in the direction of this park. It’s a disc golf area with walking trails, and although it’s not fenced either they need some exercise. I leash the Chiweenie Brothers and we take off.

We stay at the Bozeman Wally for three nights, spending our days at Rose Park. It rains off and on, and I am exhausted not really wanting to find another camp just yet. This Walmart is very quiet. They do not allow big rig parking so we get some good rest, and this Rose Park is a good place to walk The Chiweenie Brothers.

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Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel. Hugs, Shawna

Current Read:  Colony by Anne Rivers Siddon