Interesting Person Ken Wessels

I met Ken when I sent out a plea for some mechanical advice on one of my Facebook RV Travel groups. Ken responded and graciously offered to come look, agreeing to meet me at the dog park. This was back in early February before COVID-19 disrupted life.

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While he perused my problem we had a nice chat enjoying what passes for winter in the desert southwest; blue sky and warm sunshine on this day. He mentioned having lived in Florida which promptly made me think of the Kennedy Space Center, and I asked if he had ever seen the space shuttle launch.  He told me he had seen almost all of them including the Challenger disaster back in 1984.  Wow! I needed to know that story. I asked if I could interview him and he agreed.

Ken grew up in the eastern portion of Washington State, went to college there becoming  a Communication Electronics Technician then joined the Navy in 1968 as Seaman Apprentice instead of Seaman Recruit due to his college education.

Once out of the Navy he took a bit of time off before going to work for the local Ford dealership working his way from his entry level job washing cars to doing warranty work. His boss offered to send him to mechanic school but instead choose to move with his new wife to Florida where her father lived. Packing everything they could stuff into their station wagon they drove cross country where they spent the next 20 years.

Ken worked as a television tech. It was at the back door of this business that he was able to step out and see every launch of the space shuttles and other rockets that were launched from the Kennedy Space Center, the former Cape Canaveral.  He always knew when a launch was imminent as the TVs in the shop had every channel showing the launches, and it was always break time when the launches occurred *smile*.

On January 28, 1986 Ken told me he watched in awe, as he did with every launch, as Challenger rose into the sky. Awe changed to horror as the space shuttle, 73 seconds after liftoff and carrying seven including the first American female astronaut and the first black astronaut, broke apart right before his eyes. An O-ring associated with the right solid rocket booster failed causing the shuttle to break apart.  He bows his head for a few seconds, but just before he does I see the sadness in his eyes.  I remember that day and exactly where I was. Do you?

After his wife passed in 1994, Ken spent two more years in Florida then moved to Mississippi where an old buddy of his lived and he procured a job working for ServiceMaster. He tells me he likes the southern states and warm weather and decided that northern Mississippi would become his home.

Ken’s first home on wheels was a pop-up tent trailer. He had found this unit in 2008 and had been using it on weekends and holidays. It was selling for a price he wanted to pay, but it had a downside. He was in Mississippi and the pop-up was in Illinois.  He wanted it bad enough that he took a 24 hour non-stop round trip to go pick it up, leaving early on a Saturday and was home on Sunday. Whew! Bet he loved hearing that alarm on Monday morning.

After a time, as many folks do, he felt he needed more room , and in 2010 he made the decision to move up, and he went from the pop-up to a 33′ motor home. He retired in 2012 and began to travel.

To fill in some time Ken tried camp hosting at a county park in Oregon. This is where you sign on for a specified amount of time to be the campground host signing people into the campground, cleaning restrooms, and other various and sundry jobs in return for your camping spot, hopefully with electric and water included.

The following year Ken decided to try the seasonal work that Amazon and the big chain stores like JC Penny offer during the holiday season from October through December, securing those gigs from a group called Camperforce (Amazon’s word for seasonal camping workers) and Workcamping (The word JC PENNEY uses to describe same).  These big companies used to pay all camping fees in a nearby campground wherever they happen to be needing warehouse or other jobs filled and also paid a good hourly wage. Sometimes the job is extended to include the after Christmas return-it-I-don’t-like-it rush. He enjoys these jobs more than hosting and continues to seek these holiday working gigs even though the all-paid perks are disappearing.

By 2016 he decided to do more off-roading and sold the motor home and purchased a 33′ fifth wheel, the fiver being more amendable to rough roads in outlying areas.

When the seasonal work is finished Ken heads from wherever he happens to be to someplace warm (This year it was Quartzsite) for the rest of the winter and early spring before heading back home to Mississippi for the summer and fall.

Ken has been to 29 of the 50 states: All of the west, Midwest, and the south, the southern states being his favorites as he is not a fan of the cold.

While traveling he keeps busy looking to take in anything military and never passes up a museum.  He also enjoys geocaching and has 1343 finds to his credit.

It was very nice meeting you Ken!  Thanks for the mechanical info and telling me your story. Happy and safe travels!

Haboob — Another Weather Phenomenon

People are often puzzled by this term. Mention a haboob to a non-Arizonian, and they give you a look like “say what?!? Our weatherman has a saying: “Pain before the rain”.  It pretty much sums up the excessive heat              and hot drying winds that sets us up for the start of monsoon season, Then there are the hopes and prayers Monsoon actually happens as it’s our major source of rainfall. On average we only get a whopping 6.4 inches for the entire year.

What exactly is a haboob?

An old interview with some new members of our football team gives some interesting insight. I imagine there is some form or another of this asked of each new player that joins the team, and those who don’t live in Arizona.

 The newest Arizona Cardinals weigh in:

Playing football, or any sport for that matter, in Arizona comes with some uncommon factors that don’t typically come into play elsewhere in the country.

There’s an abundance of scorpions — just ask Tre Boston — rattlesnakes and the occasional haboob.

Arizona Cardinals center Evan Boehm took it upon himself to make sure the newest members of the team were properly informed as to what exactly a haboob is. For most of the players asked, a haboob is pretty much the closest thing to the world ending, and from the looks of it, there may be a need for a refresher course in the near future for a few of the players.

“It’s when it seems like the apocalypse is coming, but really it’s only rain and sand,” wide receiver Brice Butler said.

Rookie center Mason Cole reiterated the wideout’s words. “It looks like the world’s ending, but when you are in it, it’s kind of foggy, real windy, but besides that it looks like the world’s ending,” Cole said.

For offensive lineman Korey Cunningham, the term can’t be real. “You’re lying,” Cunningham said when asked what a haboob is. “Were they the things in the cafeteria?” After experiencing the weather events firsthand, the lineman still wasn’t sure what a haboob was until he started talking about the loud phone alerts he gets when a storm’s on the way. “I thought a hurricane was about to hit, but then I was like ‘we ain’t by no water,” Cunningham said. “So then I asked someone at the table and they said it was a haboob and I looked outside and I thought the world was about to end. With all the dust in the air and it starting to get dark outside it was kind of scaring me a little bit. But it’s just a dust storm that’s all it is.”

Out of all the players, offensive lineman Justin Pugh was the most knowledgeable and even used some cinematic inspiration to give his definition of the storms. “They’re like 70-mile long, five-mile high dust storms that come before the monsoons,” Pugh said. “I feel like I’m in that movie The Mummy when the face is coming out of [the dust storm].”

But whatever you do, don’t ask rookie wide receiver C.J. Duncan what a “Haboo” is. “I don’t know what that is,” Duncan said when asked. “Is it some kind of clothing?”

So, what is the actual definition of a haboob?

Seeing your first Arizona haboob can be a lifetime event. A haboob is a huge dust storm created from the airflow of a thunderstorm or intense shower. The winds driving the haboob can reach 50 miles per hour and blow dust up to 10,000 feet into the air.

The term “haboob” is from the Arabic language and means blown. A strong Arizona haboob can last for a few hours and travel over 100 miles. The winds moving a haboob can cause sever damage and power outages. Arizona haboobs occur during the summer monsoon season. Along with Arizona, haboobs occur in New Mexico and western Texas. Visibility is likely to be zero as the wall of dust overtakes vehicles. The haboob is the Southwest’s answer to the northern whiteout.

The greater Phoenix metro area is well known for haboobs. On July 5, 2011, one of the largest Arizona haboobs ever observed occurred. This Phoenix haboob rose over 5,000 feet high. A wall of dust covered the entire Phoenix area from Apache Junction to Goodyear.

What creates an Arizona haboob?

Summer monsoons bring strong winds and concentrated down pours. As the monsoon thunderstorms collapse, they can create high outflow winds. The outflow winds cause gust fronts to form. The gust front picks up massive amounts of dust and sand which move up into the atmosphere.

See the source image

Phoenix has 1 to 3 Arizona haboobs every year. Haboobs are also prevalent in Casa Grande, AZ, about 40 miles south of Phoenix. See the Fox News video of the Phoenix Haboob. Be Patient, it takes a few seconds to load.

Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel. The Chiweenie Brothers and I are looking forward to, hopefully, doing a bit of traveling in the near future, but you know, with the way things are in Arizona and being the pariahs due to Covid …. no one wants us in their state!  Perhaps a jaunt within Arizona once the crowds clear out of the higher elevations.  We’ll see. It’s feeling pretty good sitting under the cooler that runs 24/7 even though it’s become a bit boring.  Lots of reading time.

CURRENT READ:  Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens (hard to put down!)

Just finished: The City by Dean Koontz.  A decent read by this master of the horror/thriller/suspense novel, but not one of his best in my opinion.

 

 

Arizona Monsoon

Monsoon? In Arizona?  Yes. By definition monsoon is a season, not a single storm. It is a large-scale weather pattern that involves a seasonal wind shift over a particular region and is usually accompanied by an increase in atmospheric moisture and precipitation. Our monsoon season here in Arizona started June 15th and runs through September 30th.

Arizona’s monsoon forms when the sun heats the Pacific Ocean and land at different rates. The land warms at a faster rate than the ocean creating a low-pressure zone. As the hot air rises, it forces winds to shift and fill the vacuum that is formed. All of these, in turn, enhance rainfall and thunderstorms.

Arizona’s monsoon is the northern extent of the North American Monsoon, which begins in early June in central and southern Mexico. The dry westerly winds that persist through fall, winter and spring shift to moist southerly winds, bringing thunderstorm activity into Arizona. Humidity levels increase which can lead to thunderstorms, heavy rain, lightning, hail, high winds, flash flooding, dust storms, extreme heat and sometimes tornadoes.

What is the rainiest month in the desert? July. On average rain falls for 4.2 days and typically aggregates up to 1.1″ of precipitation. Doesn’t sound like much does it? It isn’t, however, these rain storms fall fast and furious over ground that resists soaking up the water and instead it runs off into the lower lying areas—the washes and rivers—and this runoff causes the flash floods that are so common here in the Grand Canyon State. They are exceedingly dangerous and can hit without warning.

In 2017 a visiting family of ten was swept away and perished from a storm that dropped rain higher up in the mountains and a flash flood seemly appeared out of nowhere in the river bed where they were enjoying their getaway.

It is wise to be aware of gathering storm clouds and where you are at all times. Put a weather alert app on your phone and heed any warnings you receive. Do not drive into rivers running even a little higher than normal. You have no idea what is under that water. The road could be gone and you would never know it until it’s too late.

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If it’s posted to turn around do so.  There were four people, three of them children, lost last year during one of September’s storms when they ignored signs to turn around and tried to cross a flooded river. Arizona’s advice:  Turn Around Don’t Drown.

Last September’s furious storm and flash flood watch that we experienced here after our summer spent exploring New Mexico was a nice introduction to what we can expect as we spend a full summer here in 2020.

A nice thunderstorm would be welcome right about now. It’s been HOT. Our first triple digits arrived in late April.  We’d have a week of that then a week of high 80s or 90s then more triple digits.  Now that June is here the high temps are here to stay.  Twenty out of the last 24 days have all been triple digits with several 110 and above.  Yeah, a good thunderstorm to cool things off for a few days would be nice.  We take what we get, but one can wish, right?

I hope you all are well and happy. Check in with a howdy and let me know how you’re doing. I worry about ya! Hugs, Shawna

CURRENT READ: The Price of Paradise by Susana Lopez Rubio  Set in Havana, Cuba in the 50s.  ****

 

Covid-19 and Home Sweet Home

May 2020 for the months of February to May. I am pretty sure somewhere along the line during the trip from AZ to CA and back to say goodbye to my sister I contracted Covid-19. I gassed up 10 different times and there were a lot of people, mostly from out-of-state by the amount of traffic heading south at the end of the day, in the Mammoth Lakes area for the skiing and getting fuel for the return trip.  Or …

Perhaps my sister had it. When I received a copy of her death certificate she had listed what was not a surprise, COPD for “years”. The other three: Acute chronic respiratory failure, bilateral pulmonary emboli (blood clots in her lungs), and unspecified pneumonia, all listed as “days”.  Hmmm.  Just a thought that crossed my mind.  I was at her side holding her hand, stroking her cheek or forehead, leaning over to talk to her for the majority of the ten days I was there.   Anyway, I was sick for three weeks and it seemed like a hybrid of a cold and the flu. Grateful I had gotten back home before it really hit me.

Plans to use up the last months of my New Mexico State Parks pass didn’t come to fruition because of Covid-19 and The Chiweenie Brothers and I settled in on our little piece of Arizona. Once feeling better I got busy with installing snake fencing along the chain link fence on the north side.  Shade cloth was put up along the east side of our cool cover, a cement block wall was put up between the casita and the laundry shed. It works as a chiweenie barrier to keep them in the back and unable to see anyone who happens to pass by, AND it’s snake proof. I planted some rescued cacti out in the front, and  I also had to dig up most of the succulents I planted in the back last fall as the 112 degree heat (triple digits for two weeks beginning in late APRIL!!) was frying them.  Thankfully the evaporative cooler works really well; as long as it’s below about 105 degrees.  Then it is just okay, but certainly better than not having one!

Being an introvert and a homebody the stay-at-home order from Governor Ducey didn’t bother me a bit until I couldn’t get outside. Then I did get a little stir crazy.   For a while it was even too hot/windy in the early mornings to even enjoy my coffee under the patio umbrella. Like the crazy weather a lot of you are having, it has been bouncing back and forth.  Last week we got back down into the 90s, then two days of 80s, and now the temps will begin marching toward triple digits again.

Nothing prettier than cactus flowers

Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel.  We’re mostly staying put for the summer so I can keep the new transplants watered, but hopefully we can take a couple of short trips. I will definitely be researching places to go for next year, and I may publish a few destinations we are thinking about. Next month I  have an interesting person post to share. Hugs, Shawna

Lots of books were read over the months of winter and during the stay-at-home order.

Unspeakable Things by Jess Lourey. Fictional novel inspired by a true event. ****

In an Instatnt by Suzanne Redfearn. ***** five stars.  Written from an interesting perspective, this book tells the story of a horrific accident and its aftermath; how each person’s character is revealed as they make life altering decisions during their struggle for survival.

Thief River Falls by Brian Freeman.  I thought this book was just okay (THIS wouldn’t happen! I kept saying to myself.  How stupid) because of an implausible story line until there very end when the story line is explained.  *****

The Other Wife. Another ***** five star read. Well written with lots of surprises.

The Devil’s Work by Mark Edwards. **** Well written thriller that bounces back and forth between 1999 and 2015 with, of course, a surprise ending.  Only four star simply because, I think, it wasn’t quite as good as the others I have read so far this year.

The Stillwater Girls by Minka Kent, ****. Full of surprises and a happy ending.

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn (author of Gone Girl, A MUST READ!). A who-done-it murder mystery about a dysfunctional family with a surprise ending.  Four stars.

Rain Will Come by Thomas Holgate, ****.  Fast-paced thriller abiut a serial killer, but with a twist. Not for the squeamish although it isn’t TOO bad.

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rowls.  Re-read this classic which I both love and hate.

Twisted Twenty-Six by Janet Evanovich.  Another light-hearted Stephanie Plum read.  Grandma Mazur marries into the mob!

When We Believed in Mermaids by Barbara O’Neal, ****. Nice coming-of-age story. A nice, but hard to believe, love story. A nice read about forgiveness.

And last-but-not-least Girl Next Door by Willow Rose.  *** three stars.  I found this one just okay.  When the author named a male cat Misty I was instantly put off. The story line about a serial killer and woman who leaves an abusive relationship ending up in the same town with her high school sweetheart who is a detective that speaks like a woman would speak put me off.  Then the cat is miraculously described as a female cat toward the end.  Who edited this???

Catching Up

Hello Friends! With the COVID-19 lurking around and people being asked to self isolate I thought this would be a good time to get  caught up on 2DogsTravel.
Since finding this bugger Snake in my little home this past fall and having it removed by a couple of our wonderful fire department personnel (THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!) things pretty much went down hill.

Thanksgiving and Christmas were uneventfull except for the morning lows in the mid-20s for a week between Christmas and New Years. Another reason to be thankful that I have a warm(er) place to hunker down in the Arizona Winter.
Welcoming in 2020 we were delighted with this fabulous sunset

                                                       Gotta love Arizona sunsets.
Late January brought news that my SIL, Karen, had been hospitalized diagnosed with myeloma. That on top of diabetes and Parkinson’s. To her credit she had agreed to the bone marrow testing; she is not one who can handle much pain so this really surprised me. She had lived with her sister in Oregon for the past two years since my brother passed, and Sharon was her primary care giver. I  will be eternally grateful for this.

To make a long agonizing story shorter, she was finally sent home. Weak, discouraged, and with the knowledge that she would be taking chemo for the rest of whatever her life span would be, Karen decided that the treatments, constant doctor’s appointments, and continual tests were too much. She decided to let nature take its course and requested that all her meds to be withheld including her diabetes medications.  That, of course, put her into a diabetic coma and in less than two days she was released from her torment and went home to be with her Lord.
Ten days later I got a call from my niece that it was time to come say goodbye to my sister. Edie had been in rehab, again, to try and get her up and walking after yet another hospitalization in December. She came down with pneumonia on top of her CHF, years with COPD, and several bouts with sepsis. She continued to decline in hospital and come to the point of not being able to swallow amongst other various ailments. The doctors said she would never make it out of hospital and she didn’t.
I made the fastest trip ever to California (Hey, I could still be a truck driver if I wanted to . . . at least for a couple of days!).

One of us was with her 24/7 until she took her last breath at 9:30 a.m. February 27th. I stayed for a couple more days to help as I could and to visit with my sons before making a mad dash for Arizona before an incoming storm arrived.

The Chiweenie Brothers and I didn’t quite make it ahead of the storm and it was a snowy drive higher up on Hwy 44 near Lassen Park, but we came out the other side just fine and didn’t hit snow again until near Mammoth Lakes on Hwy 395 where the worst of this section of the highway was starting, but it wasn’t too bad.

Some shots taken with my phone on the trip back.
Mono Lake March 2020     MONO LAKE
The halfway point in our trip is right about Lone Pine, CA Where we spent a very brutal, cold night in the Alabama Hills. The wind coming off Mt. Whitney and surrounding Sierra Nevada made it feel like my hands were going to fall off and permanent grimace left on my face when we got parked for the night and The Boys needed their evening potty walk. I was so glad to have dug through a couple of my storage bins while in Redding and had brought my sleeping bag back with me.

A cold-but-windless morning presented a beautiful dawn creeping over the horizon.

Alabama Hills March 2020 Dawn is Breaking

Sunrise Alabama Hills March 2020
And this interesting little dinosaur, eh?
Alabama Hills Dinosaur Graffiti
A stop at McD’s for coffee and The Chiweenie Brothers and I head for the barn. I was  feeling a bit off, but was determined to get back to our little desert hideaway.

Back in Arizona The Boys relax after racing around their tiny back yard trying to get some of that pent up energy burned off. DSC_0024

I am totally exhausted and don’t even bother with unpacking the car.

Thank you for stopping by 2DogsTravel. Hugs, Shawna

PSA From the Chiweenie Brothers

We wish you all a  happy and healty 2020.  Worried about dog food and treat recalls?  Please read the article below and consider signing up for alerts.   We don’t want our furry readers getting sick … Or worse!  Hugs, Fries and Carlie

Dog Food Advisor
Saving Good Dogs from Bad Dog Food
http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com

P. O. Box 2363
Naples FL 34106
USA

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It’s Coming to an End

September 5, 2019
Leaving Winslow after our short visit to Standing on the Corner Park, we make a dash for Flagstaff, the air becoming noticeably cooler the closer we get. Taking the exit for Walnut Canyon I look for the same camp we stayed in year before last. There is no one parked there! Yeah! Shade, privacy, and memories—the little juniper tree I backed into then, tearing out the van’s right tail light, is still there, limb hanging down. Dead but still attached to the little tree.
I make camp, feed The Boys, fix dinner, then lie down to read for a little while. I had intended on staying a couple of days, but I am restless. After reading a chapter in my book I get up. I take down the tarp and put away the camp chair. The need, for some reason, to get “home” is pulling at me, so with nothing but a quick morning walk for The Chiweenie Brothers we will be ready to pull out first thing in the morning.
A thunder storm rolls through—nothing like Coyote Creek State Park in NM!!—and we get a bit of rain. It’s much cooler up here at the higher elevation and sleep will be good.
Upon awakening in the morning I haven’t changed my mind, and we drive into Flagstaff where I get supplies at Wally. One more stop, at the Cricket phone store, and we are soon on our way to Williams where we head south, ending up in Prescott.
I drive through town and on the way out locate the White Spar Campground where we spend the night. We were here, too, year before last. I got lost hiking. Haven’t told that story yet. Perhaps before winter is over.
On the morning of the 7th we head out at the crack of dawn. It’s only 120 miles to Quartzsite (Q Town). We wind our way, slowly, down the 15 mile long grade that twists and turns down the narrow mountain road, finally arriving at Yarnell, then on to Congress. Once out onto Hwy 60 we turn right and drive the last leg of our journey. Our adventure is over for this year.
We are back in Q by noon, and the first thing is to get the cooler going. It’s still triple digits here, and our little place is HOT. The floor is hot. The walls are hot. It’s stifling and the sweat runs in rivulets off my brow.

It takes two days, the swamp cooler running around the clock, to get our tiny one room/one bathroom casita cooled off, but we’re “home”. I begin making a list of the many things that I intend to get done this fall and winter. Lots of things to do to make our winter retreat the haven I want it to be.
Here is where I will take my annual hiatus for the holidays. Not sure exactly when in January I will be writing again. It may be February. It may be spring. We may or may not take off in January for a getaway trip while our little town of 3000 is overrun by snowbirds to the tune of 90,000 plus. Or we may stay put and hunker down until the New Year is a little older. Playing it by ear.
Thank you for riding along with us on our New Mexico adventure. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Hugs, Shawna

CURRENT READ:  Voyager (3rd book in the Outlander series) by Diane Galbadon. Checked out from the library for the third time — too much to do for reading!!
The desert tells a different story every time one ventures into it — Robert Edison Fulton
PS Any suggestions for where to go next summer? Someplace you’ve been that’s awesome? Some place you’ve always wanted to see? Would love your suggestions.

Standing on the Corner

September 4, 2019 continued.
By the time we leave the dog park and are once again heading west the day has really warmed up. The drive to Winslow is uneventful. I stop for a quick lunch, head to Family Dollar where I get a bag of ice, some chew toys for The Chiweenie Brothers, and ask the clerk how to get to the library.
Once at the library I make an attempt at getting some blogging done, but even at 9:30 in the morning it is really heating up. We can’t sit here in the sun. Closing the laptop I look at two expectant faces.
What are we going to do? Drive on to Flagstaff or ….. “I know, Boys” I tell them, “Let’s go stand on the corner in Winslow, Arizona!” 2DogsTravel are up for anything as long as the drive is slow enough they can hang their heads out the window. We find the “park” AND a parking space. I leash them up, and we go exploring.
A nice guy and his son agree to take our photo with the bronze statues of Glen Frey and Jackson Browne who wrote the Eagles’ classic song, Take it Easy, which by the way is being blasted out onto the sidewalk, along with other Eagles’ songs. I return the favor and take their photo.

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That’s about all there is to see except for some window shopping which I don’t want to do; it’s too hot to walk around much.

On the way back to the van we find a bench in the shade of the building’s covered sidewalk and we take a little break.

The boys are loving all this people watching.

The Boys eventually get bored with being people watchers, and we are soon back on the road, heading to Flagstaff where we will spend the night at a former campsite near Walnut Canyon.

Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel and HAPPY THANKSGIVING! Hugs, Shawna

Holbrook AZ

September 4th. I packed up last night and we’re ready to roll. It’s a lovely morning; a clear sky and air warm enough to make one understand it will heat up fast today. I give The Chiweenie Brothers their breakfast and while they eat I get dressed. A quick walk for their morning business, and we’re on our way. Goodbye Bluewater. We’ll be back!

Once we are back at I-40 we cross the freeway and catch the on ramp heading west, Gallup NM our destination. It’s only about 30 miles away.

I need to find the library, the post office, and a branch of my bank. Gallup is an old town, and to my dismay all the places I need to be are in the old part of town which was built on uneven terrain. We go up and we go down, circle the library a few times and still cannot find a place to park.

We go up and we go down searching for the bank. Geez, one could easily lose a mirror on these narrow streets! Once I locate it I see a couple of parking spots, but the lot is TINY. I pull in and jockey MissAdventure around, finally getting her parked. Being careful not to hit the car next to me with the door I squeeze out and head for the bank’s doors. They aren’t quite open yet. I get in the line waiting.

In just a few minutes the doors are unlocked. In I go and get my business taken care of, trot back out to the van, and decide once I get out of this parking lot that I will forego the post office and will not even try for the library again. We’re outta here.

Back on I-40 we say goodbye to New Mexico and enter Arizona where we stop in Holbrook and 2DogsTravel get a romp at the town’s lovely dog park.

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Several large hunks of petrified wood line the roadway leading into the town of Holbrook.

The Chiweenie Brothers have a great time at this lovely park.


Thanks for stopping by 2Dogs! Hugs, Shawna

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You Lost What?

2 September 2019

Labor Day is winding down. After our morning walk we head back to the van and I enjoy a second mug of coffee. The boys are napping. A car parks behind the van and I see a gal get out. She comes up to the van saying something on the order of “Youhooo! Hello. Are you there?” I reluctantly put down my current read, Look Alive Twenty-Five by Janet Evanovich, and poke my head through the curtains on the side doors.

Standing way too close to the van is a young woman with a few tattoos and a couple of missing teeth. Other than that she is fairly neat and clean. “Yes?” I reply, unable to keep the suspicion out of my voice.

“Oh, I’m just wondering if you have a plug for an air mattress, she asks. I can’t find mine.” I tell her I do not, and she whirls around and walks to the back of the van and over to her little white car and drives off.

I watch as she drives north toward the upper half of the campground. Odd. She didn’t ask any other campers if they had a plug. I ponder this for a moment and think to myself that perhaps I was just targeted, possibly for a theft, otherwise why would she not ask others if they have a plug? Takes cajones for someone to try something like that in broad daylight, but that’s our world today, no?

DSC_0004Mare and Stallion

It’s time to begin thinking of a plan for the last week or so of our summer adventure. The thought of getting back to Q so early is both daunting and exciting. The temps are still triple digits there, UGH, but I am excited to get settled in and begin the projects I have planned to try and make our winter home beautiful and cozy on a shoe string. And we do have an evaporative cooler. 🙂

Dealing with the temperature is an integral part (or maybe an annoyance) of van life, but you gotta bend with the way the wind blows. It’s been an amazing summer exploring New Mexico State Parks. We’ve been blessed with so many wonderful sights, animals, and interesting people. We’ve stayed engaged and entertained by nature. Can’t beat that!

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Thanks for stopping by 2DogsTravel.  Hugs, Shawna